10 Most Common Competency Based Interview Questions

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Interviews based on competencies believe that candidates can show their ability to qualify for a role by describing relevant work experiences, both good and bad.

The questions we have for you will probe your professional background for details on the results of choices you’ve made in the past. Insights on your character, mental processes, and potential future actions are gleaned from your responses by interviewers.

People in the workplace are defined by their competencies, which include a broad variety of knowledge-based, cognitive, and behavioral abilities. The next step is to compare them to employer-specific criteria to determine whether the applicant is a good match.

Competency testing that assesses candidates before they are qualified is attractive to most businesses, particularly those with a large workforce.

This is done to make sure that the people applying have the right set of abilities for the job, but also that they can adapt to the company’s plans and potential promotions or replacements.

Typically, there are three major ways to classify competencies:

The beliefs, principles, goals, and reasons behind an individual’s actions are all part of their behavioral competencies. On the other hand, a person’s competencies may revolve on social abilities like leadership, teamwork, communication, and stress management.

Learning aptitudes, talents, and skills are common ways to evaluate cognitive competence.

The capacity to run certain technologies or systems, apply computer abilities, etc., are examples of technical competencies that include field-related knowledge and performance.

Rather than or in addition to the traditional one-on-one interview style, an increasing number of recruiters are choosing to use pre-recorded interviews.

These tests take place online and require candidates to answer questions while at home on their own time. Real recruiters or an AI system reviews the replies afterward.

In the early phases of the hiring process, when there are a high number of applicants, this strategy is used to save time for the business.

How to Tackle Questions Based on Competencies?

Competency

To be ready for competence questions, think about what you’ve done before. Get every piece of information out of your answers so the interviewer can get the whole breadth of your answer; after all, they are trying to glean as much information as possible from you.

Also, to make sure you’re ready for the actual thing, it’s a good idea to have samples of competency-based questions along with your responses.

Whether you’ve had success or failure in the past is a common topic for interviewers to bring up. If you address the issue, take stock of what you learned, and outline a strategy to not make the same mistake again, admitting you made a mistake will not hurt your interview chances.

Interview Topics and Solutions Focused on Competencies

For your convenience, we have included several sample competence interview questions and their corresponding answers. There are general questions that apply to most positions and more targeted inquiries that are unique to different occupations.

  • How do you assess your sales ability as compared with other salespeople?

Answer: I am well recognized as one of our company’s top salespeople. As the top seller in the firm, I was awarded bonuses many times.

  • Give an example of your sales ability.

Answer: I have a hard time recalling a specific instance,” makes a poor first impression. “Last month I closed a big deal with a leading computer firm.” That kind of response is indicative of a self-assured applicant. Company turnover for the past quarter was much lower due to the acquisition.

The applicant is expected to demonstrate their expertise in a competency-based interview by providing concrete examples.

Jobs that need teamwork include those in accountancy, customer service, project engineering, programming, and similar fields.

Team member interview questions often probe candidates’ social skills, capacity to work well with others, level of comfort with authoritative figures, and resilience in the face of adversity.

  • How would you describe yourself as a team member?” “What do you enjoy better, working as a team or working alone?

Answer: I work well with others. Socializing is one of my favorite things to do, and I am always happy to pitch in and help out when asked.

https://youtu.be/r_DF_2T2oio?si=BQVi5oEr85J721OT

  • Give me an example of a contribution you made to your work team.

Answer: I just finished a project for a major food firm involving five programmers. I was an integral part of the team’s ability to complete the project successfully. A note of appreciation for my efforts toward the project’s completion acknowledged my value to the team’s achievement.

  • How do you deal with working under pressure?

Answer: I can maintain my composure when faced with a pressing deadline. Just recently, for instance, our department saw a reduction in staff while the quantity of work I was assigned almost quadrupled.

The supervisors requested me to put in more hours, and even though it was a very hectic and stressful period, I was able to do my job well and professionally. Regardless of the pressure, I was able to act professionally and efficiently.

Management Interview Question

  • Please describe a major decision you were responsible for making during your most recent employment.

Answer: I had to decide whether to promote an employee to a manager not long ago, so that’s my answer. Even though I was close to one of the job prospects, I went with someone else in the end. Weakening the department, was a crucial choice.

Interviewers will not value hesitancy. Conversely, candidates who act hastily seem to be overwhelmed. Showing that you can make adult decisions is smart.

  • How do people view you as a manager?

Answer:  People respect me as a leader and authority figure in management, and they put their faith in my decisions. I can listen to other perspectives without judging them, and I can make quick decisions when I need to. In helping the company reach its objectives, I play a key role.

A strong contender is confident in his abilities and does not display excessive modesty.  Get further information about Managerial Interview Questions.

Assessment Questions for Sales Roles Based on Competencies

A few examples of competency-based interview questions are shown below:

  • How do you assess your sales ability as compared with other salespeople?

Answer: I am recognized as one of our company’s top salespeople. Several times, I was rewarded with a bonus for being the top seller in the organization.

  • Please provide an example of your sales ability?

A candidate who gives a timid response like “I have a tough time recalling a specific instance” would come out as confident.

Responses like “Last month I closed a big deal with a leading computer firm” are indicative of an assured candidate. Turnover over the previous quarter was up substantially due to the transaction.

The applicant is expected to demonstrate their ability during a competency-based interview by providing concrete examples.

Team Member Role-Based Competency Questions

Sample questions and answers based on competencies are provided here for team member roles such as programmers, customer service representatives, project engineers, accountants, and similar professions.

For team member roles, competency-based interview questions often seek to gauge candidates’ capacity to adhere to team norms, establish positive rapport, take responsibility, and perform well under duress.

  • How would you characterize your role on a team? Which is more satisfying: working in a team or on your own?

Answer: I work well with others. People are fun to be around. As a team player, I like contributing my fair part and am always eager to provide a hand.

  • Give me an example of a contribution you made to your work team.

Answer: I just finished a project for a major food firm involving five programmers. I was an integral part of the team’s ability to complete the project successfully. My efforts toward the project’s completion were recognized with a letter of appreciation.

  • How do you deal with working under pressure?

Answer: I can maintain my composure when faced with a pressing deadline. For instance, I’ve just seen a near-doubling of my workload despite a reduction in the number of employees in my department.

The supervisors requested me to put in more hours, and even though it was a very hectic and stressful period, I was able to do my job well and professionally. Despite the pressure, I was efficient and professional.

Gain Access to Additional Measures of Competence

  • Please provide an example of a significant decision you made in your last job.

I had to decide whether to promote an employee to a manager not long ago, so that’s my answer. I was close with one of the job applicants, but in the end, I went with someone else. The department was fortified by this significant decision.

Interviewers do not value hesitancy. Conversely, candidates who act hastily come seem to be overwhelmed. Showing that you can make adult decisions is smart.

  • How do people view you as a manager?

Answer: People respect me as a leader and authority figure in management, and they put their faith in my decisions.

I am able to make quick judgments and listen to other perspectives without becoming emotionally attached. I play a key role in helping the company reach its objectives.

Competency-Based Interview Tips

Competency

The following strategies may help you prepare for and succeed in a competency-based interview:

  • Explore the Position: To understand the competence framework, investigate the role. Learning about the employer, their culture, goal, and strategy may help reveal what talents and experiences they want in candidates. Although not a capability in the framework, understanding the function may be examined during an interview, so applicants should learn as much as feasible.
  • Think about evidence: Candidates must prepare examples of competence before the interview. Think about a period when leadership, numerical, or interpersonal abilities were crucial. Interviewers will frown on applicants who spend 10 minutes thinking of a competency-based answer. Historical scenarios are the lifeblood of a competency-based response. Prepare a list of past experiences for the interviewer.
  • Interview experience: So, get as many as you can. Student career assistance may involve mock interviews. Candidates should have as much interview experience as possible to familiarize themselves with the format, layout, and structure, making the encounter more natural. The smarter applicants may apply for jobs they don’t want only to be interviewed.
  • Stay calm: While some anxiousness is normal during interviews, excessive anxiety might hurt your performance. Candidates should avoid feeling worried beforehand. Showing up early, sleeping well, and doing thorough preparation/research helps reduce interview nervousness.
  • Request feedback: Most interviewers provide helpful feedback after making judgments. Even if applicants pass the interview, they should receive feedback.

This criticism may help you prevent past competency-based interview blunders and enhance your performance. Candidates may be unhappy about not being picked following an interview, but comments might help you get the most from your experience.

Conclusion

Recruiting teams and hiring managers have access to a lot of information on interviewing tactics and questions, which provides the talent of today with access to this knowledge.

Nevertheless, regardless of how skilled they are at conducting interviews, using competency-based interview questions may provide you with a clear picture of the talents and characteristics of the individuals who are being considered for employment.

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